Couch

“... the lone funsters in the Kitty-Yo stable of brooding instrumentalists, easily besting the Chicago school of post-rock mathletes.” — Jason Gross, Spin

“somewhere between functional energy and expressive groove... similar to Tortoise but with the important distinction of not being dull.” — Mike Wolf, Time Out New York

‘Profane’ is Couch’s 4th album, and their first release that’s simultaneously coming out in the US and overseas. Couch’s last record ‘Fantasy’ was their first in the US, reissued on Matador a year after its considerable impact in the UK and Germany.

With ‘Profane,’ Couch continue to expand their vision as a purely instrumental band. For the first time they add double bass, horns, strings and sometimes - no guitar. Still, they don¹t say bye-bye to rock, and make no attempts toward orchestral bombast or pop ‘sophistication.’ It¹s minimal music but it rocks and swings. Almost no other band adds raw rock sounds — without irony — to calmer jazzy tracks in such a way and still keeps it distinctly unified.

Couch’s untitled 1995 vinyl-only debut and its successor ‘Etwas Benutzen’ (1997) threw Couch straight into the center of a musical awakening happening between Weilheim, Munich and Berlin. With 1999¹s ‘Fantasy,’ they added keyboards and left behind the more traditional guitar/bass/drum sound.

Structurally and contentwise, ‘Fantasy’ was a liquid pop sketch, on which Couch still had to address certain issues surrounding instrumental music. ‘Profane,’ by contrast, is rather unsocial but completely grounded and visceral. With unhip production, authentic percussion, and rough edges, this record is the right sound for the right moment (or they just don’t give a...). Car music for the new 20 year-olds.

Couch is not about replaying electronic music or replacing the song. Instead, they find an unusual peace agreement between abstraction and melody and manage the stunt with both feet on the floor.
  1. Profane
    Couch
    Profane

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